AMVETS in Action

Category: Press Release

2016 Fall Sweepstakes Winners

Lanham, MD, November 14, 2016 — AMVETS selected the 10 lucky sweepstakes winners from thousands of entries from around the country for prizes ranging from $500 to the $10,000 grand prize. The drawing took place today at the AMVETS National Headquarters in Lanham, MD.

Proceeds from the sweepstakes will help support AMVETS’ continuing mission to deliver quality of life programs for veterans and their families.

Congratulations to the following winners of the 2016 AMVETS Veterans Day Sweepstakes:

  • $10,000.00 – Mr. & Mrs. William Carter of Huntley, IL
  • $5,000.00 – Mr. George Ben Johnson of Seabeck, WA
  • $2,500.00 – Mr. John M Evers of Iselin, NJ
  • $1,000.00 – Mr. Thomas J. Melvin of Millsboro, DE
  • $500.00 – Mrs. Betty D. Kelm of Bowling Green, KY
  • $500.00 – Mrs. M. Bissinger of Ormond Beach, FL
  • $500.00 – Mr. Charles Kelley of Davie, FL
  • $500.00 – Ms. Marlene Kearns of Pittsburgh, PA
  • $500.00 – Mr. James L. Lutz of Eastlake, OH
  • $500.00 – Mr. Robert Zellner of Green Bay, WI

About AMVETS:
A leader since 1944 in preserving the freedoms secured by America’s armed forces, AMVETS provides support for veterans and the active military in procuring their earned entitlements, as well as community service and legislative reform that enhances the quality of life for this nation’s citizens and veterans alike. AMVETS is one of the largest congressionally-chartered veterans’ service organizations in the United States, and includes members from each branch of the military, including the National Guard and Reserves. To learn more visit www.amvets.org.

‘Walking Dead’ Star to Represent American Veterans

Award-winning Actress Kerry Cahill partners with AMVETS to continue her father’s legacy of helping veterans obtain the help they need. Kerry Cahill’s father, Michael Cahill, was killed in the terrorist attack at Fort Hood.

Kerry Cahill addresses the crowd at AMVETS' 2016 National Convention
Kerry Cahill addresses the crowd at AMVETS’ 2016 National Convention
WASHINGTON, DC (October 31, 2016) – Actress and veterans’ advocate Kerry Cahill, star of AMC’s “The Walking Dead” Season 7, which premiered Oct. 23, has joined American Veterans (AMVETS) as its official spokesperson.

Cahill’s relationship with AMVETS and her fierce advocacy for veterans stem from the tragic loss of her father, Army veteran Michael Cahill, who was killed in 2009 during the now-infamous terrorist attack on Fort Hood, Texas, while treating pre- and post-deployment soldiers as a physician’s assistant at the Soldier Readiness Program there.

Cahill said, “I am excited to be working with AMVETS, it’s one of the oldest and most inclusive veteran’s organizations. They have a dedication to service, and I will carry that mantle as well. My dad’s mission was simple, get every soldier, every patient, every veteran the care they needed. I will be continuing that mission. I’m excited to be able to be a megaphone for the men and women that have fought so hard for us. They fought for us; I will fight for them.”

In her capacity as AMVETS’s spokesperson, Cahill will be actively engaging the media and the public to advocate for veterans and raise awareness about the issues they face, such as lowering an alarming rate of suicide that claims one veteran every 72 minutes.

About Kerry Cahill
Born in Helena, Montana, Kerry Cahill grew up an army brat in small rural towns of Montana, Oregon, and Texas. Cahill studied Drama at Loyola University New Orleans; the British American Drama Academy Oxford; and Queen’s University Belfast, later moving to Chicago to study with Second City, the Profiles Theater, and Rick Snyder. Cahill’s film break came under the direction of Werner Herzog in Bad Lieutenant: Port of Call New Orleans. Her film career has continued to gain momentum as she has worked alongside Reese Witherspoon, Paul Walker, Uzo Aduba, and Woody Harrelson. She appeared alongside Jason Clark in Terminator Genisys and had a significant role in the recent film Free State of Jones with director Gary Ross and actor Matthew McConaughey. Cahill can now be seen on one of television’s hottest shows, The Walking Dead. Having filmed projects such as By Way of Helena, Showing Roots, ZOO, and Free State of Jones, Cahill continues her upward climb to A-list status and is recognized as an award-winning actress that plays strong characters next to some of the biggest names in Hollywood.

For more information about Kerry Cahill please contact her publicist Tracie Hovey at 202-248-5003.

Original Source: Actress and Advocate: ‘Walking Dead’ Star to Represent American Veterans

Suicide Prevention Month: #BeThere

IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:
Department of Veterans Affairs
Office of Public Affairs/Media Relations
Washington, DC 20420
Phone: (202) 461-7600
www.va.gov

VA Highlights Initiatives to Prevent Veteran and Servicemember Suicide

WASHINGTON – Today marks the start of Suicide Prevention Month and the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is asking for the entire nation’s help in reducing Veteran suicide. VA is calling on community leaders, supervisors, colleagues, friends, and family members to BeThere for Veterans and Service members starting with a simple act, which can play a pivotal role in preventing suicide.

“You don’t have to be a trained professional to support someone who may be going through a difficult time,” said Dr. Caitlin Thompson, Director of the VA Office of Suicide Prevention. “We want to let people know that things they do every day, like calling an old friend or checking in with a neighbor, are strong preventive factors for suicide because they help people feel less alone. That’s what this campaign is about – encouraging people to be there for each other.”

The campaign also highlights VA resources that are available to support Veterans and Servicemembers who are coping with mental health challenges or are at risk for suicide, and it encourages everyone to share these resources with someone in their life.

“We hope our Suicide Prevention Month efforts help educate people about the VA and community resources available nationwide,” said VA Under Secretary for Health David J. Shulkin, M.D. “We’re committed to working with experts and organizations across the country to identify ways we can help Veterans and Servicemembers get the care they deserve and to expand the network of mental health support.”

Veteran suicide data released by the VA Office of Suicide Prevention in early August 2016 serves as a foundation for informing and evaluating suicide prevention efforts inside the VA health care system and for developing lifesaving collaborations with community-based health care partners.

VA plans to host a series of roundtable discussions with key stakeholder groups in the coming months as part of its plan to develop a public health strategy for preventing Veteran suicide. In August, VA hosted its first roundtable discussion, “Suicide Prevention is Everyone’s Business,” with corporate sector partners. In September, VA will host the Veterans Affairs Suicide Prevention Innovations event, which will bring together a community of experts from business, industry, academia, and government agencies to collaboratively identify solutions for reducing suicide rates among Veterans and Servicemembers. In addition, new programs such as REACH VET are being launched nationwide in September to identify Veterans in VHA care who may be vulnerable, in order to provide the care they need before a crisis occurs.

For more information about VA’s suicide prevention efforts:

Army Cpl. Curtis J. Wells of Korean War Accounted For

IMMEDIATE RELEASE

September 1, 2016

Contact:
Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (Public Affairs)
Washington, DC 20301-2300
Phone: (703) 699-1420
Fax: (703) 602-4375

Fulfilling Our Nation’s Promise
Soldier Missing From Korean War Accounted For

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, missing from the Korean War, have been identified and will be returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Cpl. Curtis J. Wells, 19, of Ubly, Michigan, will be buried Sept. 10 in Harbor Beach, Michigan. In late November 1950, while Wells was assigned to Company C, 65th Engineer Combat Battalion, 25th Infantry Division, his company joined with Task Force (TF) Wilson to fight the Chinese People’s Volunteer Forces (CPVF) in the vicinity of Unsan, North Korea. The TF was overwhelmed by a large force of CPVF soldiers, and by Nov. 27, 1950, they began to extricate themselves south and Company C returned to the control of the battalion. As the battalion attempted to account for its casualties, Wells was reported missing in action.

Wells’ name did not appear on any POW list provided by the CPVF or the Korean People’s Army, nor did any repatriated American POWs have any information about Wells.

In late 1953, as part of a prisoner of war exchange, known as “Operation Big Switch,” no repatriated Americans had any knowledge of Wells’ whereabouts. As a result of this, the U.S. Army declared him deceased as of March 18, 1954.

In October 1998, during a Joint Recovery Operation, a U.S./North Korean recovery team excavated a site in Kujang County, North P’yongan-Pukto Province, North Korea, based on information provided by witnesses concerning buried American soldiers. This site correlated with the area of the battle between TF Wilson and the CPVF.

To identify Wells’ remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory used circumstantial evidence, DNA analysis, including mitochondrial DNA, Y-chromosome Short Tandem Repeat and autosomal DNA, which matched two brothers, as well as dental and anthropological analysis, which matched Wells’ records.

Today, 7,802 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using advances in technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that were previously turned over by North Korean officials or recovered by American teams.

For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil, find us on social media at www.facebook.com/dodpaa/ or call (703) 699-1420.

EOD Warrior Foundation Seeks Tech in Need of Assistance Dog

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT:
Cher Murphy
Cher@chermurphypr.com
571-263-2128

EOD Warrior Foundation Seeks EOD Tech in Need of Assistance Dog

The EOD Warrior Foundation is partnering with MADE in Texas Assistance Dogs to pair a trained service dog with an EOD technician in need

NICEVILLE, Florida – (August 1, 2016) – Many EOD technicians need assistance when they return home from combat. Those who suffer from conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) often find that service dogs bring relief, others who have physical injuries, including amputations, blindness, and many others, may find benefit in having a service dog for multiple reasons. The EOD Warrior Foundation is partnering with MADE in Texas Assistance Dogs to provide an EOD technician in need with a fully trained service dog.  This dog is being donated in honor of former U.S. Navy EOD officer, Commander Kevin Childre, who passed away in May 2015 as a result of a bicycle accident while on a ride raising awareness for the EOD Warriors Foundation.

“We are pleased to work with MADE in Texas Assistance Dogs to find a fitting home for this beautiful animal, and a deserving EOD technician,” explains Nicole Motsek, executive director of the EOD Warrior Foundation. “We are also thrilled to honor Kevin, who meant so much to the country and did so much for our foundation. Kevin was a true dog lover and I feel this is a great way to honor his memory.”

Kevin Childre was an Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) technician who started the annual 2-Day EOD Undefeated Bike Ride in 2009 to support the EOD community, which quickly became the largest fundraiser for the EOD Warrior Foundation, raising almost $1.3 million in support of EOD families in its six year history. While on a 6-day bicycle ride to raise awareness for the cause he was in a fatal accident. The annual ride continues in four cities across the country this fall in his honor.

Wanting to honor his memory, MADE in Texas Assistance Dogs began training a goldendoodle puppy to become an assistance dog.  Kevin’s last dog was also a beautiful goldendoodle named Tucker.  The puppy currently in training is named KC, in honor of Kevin Childre. KC will finish training this fall and will be ready to be paired with an EOD technician in need. The EOD Warrior Foundation is working with MADE to provide the selected candidate with travel and accommodations to meet KC.

“We believe in what Kevin did for our country and feel this is a great way to honor him,” explained Hailey Jumper Mauldin, founder and executive director of MADE in Texas Assistance Dogs. “Helping fellow EOD technicians was Kevin’s life and KC will help continue the mission in Kevin’s honor. We are thrilled to be a part of this legacy.”

EOD technicians who are interested in KC can apply online at the MADE in Texas Assistance Dogs site: http://www.madeintexasassistancedogs.org.

There are over 7,000 men and women in the U.S. military who serve as EOD techs. They have one of the most dangerous jobs in the military, helping to defuse and dispose of explosive devices. They are highly trained members who are responsible for disarming, rendering safe, and disposing of bombs.

Since September 11, 2001, the EOD community has sustained serious loss of life and limbs. Since 9/11 and to date, 131 EOD Warriors have lost their lives on the battlefield, approximately 250 EOD Warriors have lost limbs, sight, experienced terrible burns, as well as paralysis, and numerous additional warriors continue to suffer from the invisible wounds of war, including traumatic brain injury and post traumatic stress. The numbers of invisible injuries are unknown at this point and the suicide rate numbers are quickly approaching the number lost in combat.

About EOD Warrior Foundation

The EOD Warrior Foundation is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to help EOD warriors and their family members to include families of fallen EOD warriors. Specific programs include emergency financial relief, college scholarships, hope and wellness retreats, and care of the EOD Memorial located at Eglin AFB, FL. To learn more about the EOD Warrior Foundation, visit their site at: www.eodwarriorfoundation.org.

# # #

Marine From World War II, Pfc. Charles E. Oetjen, 18, of Blue Island, Illinois, Accounted For

IMMEDIATE RELEASE

July 22, 2016

Contact:
Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (Public Affairs)
Washington, DC 20301-2300
Phone: (703) 699-1420
Fax: (703) 602-4375

Fulfilling Our Nation’s Promise
Marine From World War II Accounted For

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, unaccounted for since World War II, have been identified and are being returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Marine Pfc. Charles E. Oetjen, 18, of Blue Island, Illinois, will be buried July 30, in Alsip, Illinois. In November 1943, Oetjen was assigned to Company E, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marines, 2nd Marine Division, which landed against stiff Japanese resistance on the small island of Betio in the Tarawa Atoll of the Gilbert Islands, in an attempt to secure the island. Over several days of intense fighting at Tarawa, approximately 1,000 Marines and Sailors were killed and more than 2,000 were wounded, but the Japanese were virtually annihilated. Oetjen died sometime on the first day of battle, Nov. 20, 1943.

The battle of Tarawa was a huge victory for the U.S. military because the Gilbert Islands provided the U.S. Navy Pacific Fleet a platform from which to launch assaults on the Marshall and Caroline Islands to advance their Central Pacific Campaign against Japan.

In the immediate aftermath of the fighting on Tarawa, U.S. service members who died in the battle were buried in a number of battlefield cemeteries on the island. In 1946 and 1947, the 604th Quartermaster Graves Registration Company conducted remains recovery operations on Betio Island, but Oetjen’s remains were not recovered. On Feb. 28, 1949, a military review board declared Oetjen’s remains non-recoverable.

In June 2015, a nongovernmental organization, History Flight, Inc., notified DPAA that they discovered a burial site on Betio Island and recovered the remains of what they believed were 35 U.S. Marines who fought during the battle in November 1943. The remains were turned over to DPAA in July 2015.

To identify Oetjen’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory used mitochondrial DNA analysis, which matched a cousin; laboratory analysis, including dental and anthropological analysis and chest radiograph comparison, which matched Oetjen’s records; as well as circumstantial and material evidence.

DPAA is grateful to History Flight, Inc. for this recovery mission.

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000 died during the war.

For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil or call (703) 699-1420.

###

Pfc. Charles E. Oetjen, 18, of Blue Island, Illinois, has now been  accounted for from World War II and will be buried July 30th in Alsip, IL
Pfc. Charles E. Oetjen, 18, of Blue Island, Illinois, has now been
accounted for from World War II and will be buried July 30th in Alsip, IL

Soldier Missing From Korean War, Army Chief Warrant Officer Adolphus Nava, 38, of Uniondale, New York, Accounted For

IMMEDIATE RELEASE

July 28, 2016

Contact:

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (Public Affairs)
Washington, DC 20301-2300
Phone: (703) 699-1420
Fax: (703) 602-4375

Fulfilling Our Nation’s Promise
Soldier Missing From Korean War Accounted For

Army Chief Warrant Officer Adolphus Nava, 38, of Uniondale, New York, will be buried with full military honors on August 4, in Calverton, New York.
Army Chief Warrant Officer Adolphus Nava, 38, of Uniondale, New York, will be buried with full military honors on August 4, in Calverton, New York.
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, missing from the Korean War, have been identified and will be returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Chief Warrant Officer Adolphus Nava, 38, of Uniondale, New York, will be buried August 4, in Calverton, New York. In late 1950, Nava was a member of Battery B, 38th Field Artillery Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division, fighting the Chinese People’s Volunteer Forces (CPVF) between the towns of Sinhung-dong and Kunu-Ri, North Korea. Their mission was part of a United Nations Command offensive to advance north to the Yalu River. On Nov. 29, the unit was in danger of being encircled and destroyed by the CPVF and were ordered to withdraw. In the escape route, termed “The Gauntlet,” units were overrun by aggressive attacks from the CPVF, and Nava’s unit elected to destroy its guns and escape through the mountains on foot.

For more than a week after the battle, soldiers made their way through enemy lines back to their units. After searching all adjacent units, aid stations and hospitals, Nava was declared missing in action as of Nov. 30.

At the end of the war, during Operation Big Switch, where both sides exchanged all remaining POWs, repatriated Americans provided information on the capture and death of Nava at Pyoktong/Camp 5, where most prisoners of war from the unit were held.

Although the American Graves Registration Service hoped to recover the remains of United Nations Command (UNC) and American soldiers who remained north of the DMZ after the war, conflict between the UNC and North Korea complicated efforts.

Between 1990 and 1994, North Korea returned to the United States 208 boxes of commingled human remains, which when combined with remains recovered during joint recovery operations in North Korea between 1996 and 2005, included the remains of at least 600 U.S. servicemen who fought during the war. North Korean documents included in the repatriation indicated that some of the remains were recovered from the vicinity where Nava was believed to have died.

To identify Nava’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory used mitochondrial, Y-chromosome Short Tandem Repeat and autosomal DNA analysis, which matched his brother and daughter, as well as chest radiograph comparison and anthropological analyses, and circumstantial evidence

Today, 7,807 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North Korea by American recovery teams.

For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil or call (703) 699-1420.

-end-

USS Oklahoma Sailor From World War II, Navy Fireman 2nd Class James B. Boring, Accounted For

IMMEDIATE RELEASE

July 29, 2016

Contact:

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (Public Affairs)

Washington, DC 20301-2300

Phone: (703) 699-1420

Fax: (703) 602-4375

Fulfilling Our Nation’s Promise

USS Oklahoma Sailor From World War II Accounted For

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman from World War II have been identified and will be returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Navy Fireman 2nd Class James B. Boring, 21, of Vales Mill, Ohio, will be buried August 6, in Albany, Ohio. On Dec. 7, 1941, Boring was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Boring. No single vessel at Pearl Harbor, with the exception of the USS Arizona, suffered as many fatalities.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu’uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Boring.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for analysis.

To identify Boring’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory used mitochondrial DNA analysis, which matched two nieces, as well as circumstantial evidence and laboratory analysis, to include dental comparisons, which matched Boring’s records.

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000 died during the war.

For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil or call (703) 699-1420.

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Lorraine Plass, AMVETS State Legislative Chair, Honored By CA State Senate

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Thursday, July 20, 2016

Contact: Dana Nichol
Phone: (916) 492-0550
Fax: (916) 492-8957
Email: dana.nichol@sbcglobal.net

Lorraine Plass and Senator Steven Glazer (center) with members of the California State Senate presenting Member’s Resolution 637 to Ms. Plass
Lorraine Plass and Senator Steven Glazer (center) with members of the California State Senate presenting Member’s Resolution 637 to Ms. Plass

Lorraine Plass, the AMVETS-Department of California’s Legislative Committee Chair, was recently honored on the floor of the California State Senate by Senator Steven Glazer (D-Orinda) for her advocacy at the State Capitol on behalf of veterans for the past six years. She was also being honored for her work on Senate Resolution 69, which deals with the World War II Port Chicago disaster. Port Chicago is located in Senator Glazer’s district.

Plass received a California Senate Resolution signed by Senator Glazer which expresses “the deep appreciation for her dedication and contributions to the passage of Senate Resolution 69, and conveyed best wishes that her indomitable efforts will continue in the years ahead”.

“In my 30 years at the State Capitol, I have seen few volunteers for veterans advocacy as dedicated as Lorraine. She has become a well-known and familiar figure in the halls of the Legislature. Her advocacy on behalf of veterans has been an inspiration to all of us who get to work with her on veterans issues here at the Capitol”, said veterans advocate Pete Conaty (LTC, U.S. Army-Ret).

Plass served in the U.S. Army from 1974 to 1978 in both the United States and Germany. Following her active service, she served for six years in the California National Guard. Plass was recently appointed as the AMVETS National Legislative Co-Chair, a newly created National Committee.

About AMVETS
or American Veterans was formed in 1944 to help WWII veterans obtain the benefits promised by the federal government. AMVETS continues this commitment to America’s veterans, their families, and the active military by assisting them in securing their earned entitlements. Team AMVETS strongly supports legislation to provide services to veterans. AMVETS Department of California has over 10,000 members and over 51 local posts in the state, as well as thrift shops. AMVETS is involved in helping hospitalized veterans, Special Olympics, scouting, organ donor projects, national monuments, and living by their commitment to make a difference in the lives of others.

Free AMVETS Membership for Student Veterans

We (the veterans in AMVETS) offer you free membership in appreciation for your military service. Only one in ten Americans has the fortitude to volunteer for military service. AMVETS knows the sacrifices of service and we offer you free membership in AMVETS while you are students.

AMVETS began as a group of loosely tied college veterans clubs. We know your struggles, we have been on the path you are travelling and are prepared to help.

AMVETS (American Veterans) was chartered by congress in 1947 (public law 216).We are mandated to helping veterans reintegrate into the American workforce. Our charter allows honorably discharged and actively serving military personnel to become members. Membership is available to all the services: Army, Air Force, Navy and Marines Corps, and members of the National Guard, Reserve and Coast Guard. The GI Bill and the VA home loan program are key initiatives we supported until they became law. Two programs you may be interested in are:

The Call of Duty Endowment works through AMVETS to find veterans jobs.

AMVETS National Service Officers will shepherd your VA claim.

AMVETS is prepared to help you succeed. Go to the link below.

Free Student Membership: https://www.amvetsmembers.org/eweb/DynamicPage.aspx?Site=AMVETS&WebKey=c16108b2-8ce2-44e0-b1ff-a5be37a379cb&Action=Add

Please pass this on to other student veterans.

Visit AMVETS at www.amvets.org

If you have any question contact: hneal@amvets.org