AMVETS in Action

Tag: Army

Soldier Missing From Korean War, Army Chief Warrant Officer Adolphus Nava, 38, of Uniondale, New York, Accounted For

IMMEDIATE RELEASE

July 28, 2016

Contact:

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (Public Affairs)
Washington, DC 20301-2300
Phone: (703) 699-1420
Fax: (703) 602-4375

Fulfilling Our Nation’s Promise
Soldier Missing From Korean War Accounted For

Army Chief Warrant Officer Adolphus Nava, 38, of Uniondale, New York, will be buried with full military honors on August 4, in Calverton, New York.
Army Chief Warrant Officer Adolphus Nava, 38, of Uniondale, New York, will be buried with full military honors on August 4, in Calverton, New York.
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, missing from the Korean War, have been identified and will be returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Chief Warrant Officer Adolphus Nava, 38, of Uniondale, New York, will be buried August 4, in Calverton, New York. In late 1950, Nava was a member of Battery B, 38th Field Artillery Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division, fighting the Chinese People’s Volunteer Forces (CPVF) between the towns of Sinhung-dong and Kunu-Ri, North Korea. Their mission was part of a United Nations Command offensive to advance north to the Yalu River. On Nov. 29, the unit was in danger of being encircled and destroyed by the CPVF and were ordered to withdraw. In the escape route, termed “The Gauntlet,” units were overrun by aggressive attacks from the CPVF, and Nava’s unit elected to destroy its guns and escape through the mountains on foot.

For more than a week after the battle, soldiers made their way through enemy lines back to their units. After searching all adjacent units, aid stations and hospitals, Nava was declared missing in action as of Nov. 30.

At the end of the war, during Operation Big Switch, where both sides exchanged all remaining POWs, repatriated Americans provided information on the capture and death of Nava at Pyoktong/Camp 5, where most prisoners of war from the unit were held.

Although the American Graves Registration Service hoped to recover the remains of United Nations Command (UNC) and American soldiers who remained north of the DMZ after the war, conflict between the UNC and North Korea complicated efforts.

Between 1990 and 1994, North Korea returned to the United States 208 boxes of commingled human remains, which when combined with remains recovered during joint recovery operations in North Korea between 1996 and 2005, included the remains of at least 600 U.S. servicemen who fought during the war. North Korean documents included in the repatriation indicated that some of the remains were recovered from the vicinity where Nava was believed to have died.

To identify Nava’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory used mitochondrial, Y-chromosome Short Tandem Repeat and autosomal DNA analysis, which matched his brother and daughter, as well as chest radiograph comparison and anthropological analyses, and circumstantial evidence

Today, 7,807 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered from North Korea by American recovery teams.

For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil or call (703) 699-1420.

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USS Oklahoma Sailor From World War II, Navy Fireman 2nd Class James B. Boring, Accounted For

IMMEDIATE RELEASE

July 29, 2016

Contact:

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (Public Affairs)

Washington, DC 20301-2300

Phone: (703) 699-1420

Fax: (703) 602-4375

Fulfilling Our Nation’s Promise

USS Oklahoma Sailor From World War II Accounted For

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman from World War II have been identified and will be returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Navy Fireman 2nd Class James B. Boring, 21, of Vales Mill, Ohio, will be buried August 6, in Albany, Ohio. On Dec. 7, 1941, Boring was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft. The USS Oklahoma sustained multiple torpedo hits, which caused it to quickly capsize. The attack on the ship resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen, including Boring. No single vessel at Pearl Harbor, with the exception of the USS Arizona, suffered as many fatalities.

From December 1941 to June 1944, Navy personnel recovered the remains of the deceased crew, which were subsequently interred in the Halawa and Nu’uanu Cemeteries.

In September 1947, tasked with recovering and identifying fallen U.S. personnel in the Pacific Theater, members of the American Graves Registration Service (AGRS) disinterred the remains of U.S. casualties from the two cemeteries and transferred them to the Central Identification Laboratory at Schofield Barracks. The laboratory staff was only able to confirm the identifications of 35 men from the USS Oklahoma at that time. The AGRS subsequently buried the unidentified remains in 46 plots at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (NMCP), known as the Punchbowl, in Honolulu. In October 1949, a military board classified those who could not be identified as non-recoverable, including Boring.

In April 2015, the Deputy Secretary of Defense issued a policy memorandum directing the disinterment of unknowns associated with the USS Oklahoma. On June 15, 2015, DPAA personnel began exhuming the remains from the NMCP for analysis.

To identify Boring’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory used mitochondrial DNA analysis, which matched two nieces, as well as circumstantial evidence and laboratory analysis, to include dental comparisons, which matched Boring’s records.

Of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II, more than 400,000 died during the war.

For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account for Americans who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil or call (703) 699-1420.

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Farmington Amvets Post 332 golf tourney will aid local veterans, Chamber of Commerce

Farmington Amvets Post 332 golf tourney will aid local veterans, Chamber of Commerce

By Melody Burri
melody@messengerpostmedia.com

Posted Jul. 13, 2016 at 10:18 AM

FARMINGTON — Golfers will swing with purpose this Saturday at the first annual Farmington Amvets Golf Tournament, held to benefit local veterans and the Farmington Chamber of Commerce.

The inaugural event, co-hosted by the one-year-old Farmington American Veterans (Amvets) Post 332 and Farmington Chamber of Commerce, will be held July 16 at Winged Pheasant Golf Club in Shortsville.

Amvets Post 332 was chartered in July 2015 by an interested group of veterans, spearheaded by Farmington resident Richard McDermott, and has already launched a number of efforts to benefit area veterans.

Golf tournament registration is at 9 a.m., with a shotgun start at 10 a.m., McDermott said. About 50 are slated to play so far, with room for more. The 18-hole, scramble format game should take four or five hours, with “lunch at the turn” and pizza after, said McDermott. The cost is $75 per person.

Half of the proceeds will go to Amvets Post 332 to fund a number of programs already underway. The rest will go to the Farmington Chamber of Commerce.

“The first thing we did was start a scholarship program at FLCC (Finger Lakes Community College) for a veteran to go to school,” said McDermott. “We also make a monthly donation to Victor-Farmington Food Cupboard. It’s my understanding that there are about 60 veterans’ families that use the food cupboard.”

Amvets Post 332 also has a program to help subsidize winter clothing for veterans through the local chapter of Blue Star Mothers, he said. In addition, the group supplies equipment for the Canandaigua VA Medical Center’s carpenter shop, and has donated gift cards and gas cards to the Ontario County Veterans Service Agency to be distributed as needed.

Other aid has been given to the Blue Star Mothers, “a great organization,” McDermott said. Amvets Post 332 has also assisted Zion House in Avon, which offers transitional housing for female veterans in crisis.

“A couple of us from the Amvets went up and toured the place,” said McDermott. “It’s pretty impressive.”

In the future, Amvets Post 332 is expected to help support the construction of a proposed Veterans Memorial in Farmington Town Hall Park, at 1000 County Road 8, he said.

“The memorial will be a place where veterans, their families and future generations can go, sit quietly and know that their sacrifice has been acknowledged with respect by the townspeople,” said Farmington Vietnam War Commemorative Committee Chair Donna Herendeen.

To help raise funds, the Commemorative Committee is selling engraved bricks for $50 each, she said. The bricks engraved with veterans’ names will line the walkway leading to the memorial.

http://www.mpnnow.com/news/20160713/farmington-amvets-post-332-golf-tourney-will-aid-local-veterans-chamber-of-commerce

“The Big 6” United Behind Veterans First Act

“The Big 6” United Behind Veterans First Act

(Washington, D.C.)–The Veterans Service Organizations who are most often called before Congress for testimony on the state of Veterans Affairs, known in D.C. as “The Big 6,” are joining together to call on the Senate to vote on the Veterans First Act. While each has been engaged separately in traditional methods of calling for votes–such as letter-writing and email campaigns– they’re maximizing the power of social media to expand their outreach and get more veterans engaged.

“The AMVETS family is in full support of the Veterans First Act. Eliminating arbitrary eligibility requirements is crucial to ensuring family caregivers of veterans from all eras receive the support they deserve and need. We support the mandate on VA to research the association between toxic exposures and health effects among exposed veterans’ offspring.”–Joe Chenelly, Executive Director, AMVETS

“We’ve recognized that Congress is starting to respond to pressure from social media, so we are doing the best we can to optimize the impact each of our members has by enlisting them to assist in less traditional ways. While Twitter may not be used by most Vietnam veterans on a regular basis, our kids and our grandkids use it. Our families will be helped most by the Toxic Exposure Research provisions within the Veterans First Act, and we are glad to bring them into the fold so they can help us let the Senate know that we all deserve a vote.”–John Rowan, National President, Vietnam Veterans of America

“The VFW strongly supports passage of the Veterans First Act because it rightfully eliminates arbitrary eligibility requirements to ensure family caregivers of veterans from all eras receive the recognition and support they deserve. It requires the VA to research the association between toxic exposures and adverse health effects among the descendants of exposed veterans, and it makes urgently needed improvements to the choice program, which would ensure veterans who receive care from private sector doctors are not erroneously billed for that care.”–Robert E. Wallace, VFW Executive Director.

“The provision within the Veterans First Act that allows for the expansion of the Family Caregiver Program is a top priority for Paralyzed Veterans of America members. Caregivers are life-sustaining for veterans with a spinal cord or disease. They are the most critical component of our rehabilitation and eventual recovery, and their well-being directly impacts the quality of care provided to veterans. Caregivers for veterans of all wartimes should be provided with adequate benefits and resources, yet caregivers of pre-9/11 are made to bear the responsibility—and the toll it takes on their own personal and professional lives—alone. We urge the prompt passage of this legislation so that this inequity will finally be addressed.”– Sherman Gillums, Jr, Paralyzed Veterans of America Executive Director

“The American Legion stands with our sister Veteran Service Organizations to support the Veterans First Act. This bipartisan legislation has one third of the senate as cosponsors and will ensure that veterans have access to a Department of Veterans Affairs that maintains accountability, organized leadership, and parity of services for all generations of caregivers.”–Verna Davis, Executive Director, The American Legion

“DAV strongly supports Senate passage of the Veterans First Act, which would extend comprehensive caregiver support to veterans of all eras. The legislation would also increase veterans’ options for long-term care through medical foster homes; enhance VA’s efforts to recruit and retain the best and brightest medical professionals; reform claims and appeals processing by creating a fully developed appeals pilot program; and make dozens of other positive changes to improve the lives of the men and women who served. DAV looks forward to working together with leaders in both chambers of Congress, the VA, and other key stakeholders to enact comprehensive legislation to help keep the promise to all eras of America’s veterans.”–Garry J. Augustine, Executive Director, Disabled American Veterans

The Big 6 Veteran Service Organizations are asking their members, families, and supporters to join them during this campaign by using the hashtag #Vote4Vets1st in our Twitter Storm. The Veterans First Act is a bipartisan effort to improve accountability at the Department of Veterans Affairs, provide critical benefits to veterans in need, and improve existing programs. The veterans’ community deserves a vote on the Senate floor before Congress is dismissed for summer recess. In order for the Department of Veterans Affairs to fulfill Lincoln’s promise “to care for him who shall have borne the battle and for his widow, and his orphan,” they must prioritize veterans over politics and pass the Veterans First Act.

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“Salute To Veterans”, featuring Rocky Bleier, Greg Gadson and Chad Hennings

Airing Tonight: The Premiere of “Salute To Veterans”, featuring Rocky Bleier, Greg Gadson and Chad Hennings, and PBS’ Judy Woodruff

By: Kristina Miller

AMVETS was fortunate enough to sit down with all three athletes as they prepared to go on air to discuss military service, their success in the NFL and that continued commitment to success throughout transition in this new social-interactive televised format #SaluteToVeterans, which will be airing tonight and tomorrow for the 4th of July Holiday.

The ‘Salute to Veterans’ program features these 3 notable athletes with military service–Rocky Bleier, Greg Gadson and Chad Hennings–who are creating solutions in their communities for their fellow Veterans who may not be as fortunate as they have been since serving.

“Playing Football and Military Service have a natural link, ” shares Chad Hennings, US Air Force Force Graduate and 3-Time Dallas Cowboys Super Bowl Champion, “We can all reflect on commitment to achieving success. You are forever part of something bigger than yourself; it takes sacrifice to be successful.”

Rocky Bleir, a US Army Vietnam Veteran and 4-time Super Bowl Champion with the Pittsburgh Steelers, is all too familiar with being in a life of constant transition.
“Transition is always a struggle” says Rocky. “Once you are comfortable in a position or in your role, its time to transition (laughing). “

“The challenge is (in transition) the support mechanism can be taken away. How one adjusts and how you get through (inevitable) transition, determines your success.”

Greg Gadson, Retired US Army Colonel, Garrison Commander, and most recently known for his featured role in the movie Battleship (in addition to his two NY Giants Super Bowl rings), also reminds us about the importance of teamwork, and how this Salute to Veterans series is an inspirational program that engages in meaningful dialogue about the most pressing societal issues our nations 25 million veterans, 3.3 million active duty service members and their families face including: employment, unemployment and underemployment; overcoming injuries; continuing education; accessing affordable housing; and filling the need for community leaders.

“Salute to Veterans” is not only a title of the program series, but it is a call to action around the country for much deserved gratitude to be consistently given to our past and present troops, in light of their sacrifices made for freedom, liberty and safety.

#MySaluteToVeterans and the broadcast series aims to transform national military observances days, as not just holidays, but honor-days, when these important issues should be top of mind.

About Salute to Veterans
Salute to Veterans is a national television series and platform raising awareness for and engaging in meaningful discussion about the most pressing societal issues that our 25 million veterans face in communities across America, including: employment, unemployment and underemployment; overcoming injuries; continuing education; accessing affordable housing; and other important issues, while inspiring leadership in their communities.

Please visit: These three veterans are also inspiring others to thank Veterans for their sacrifice everyday through social media at #MySaluteToVeterans and SaluteToVeteranson Facebook. Also, visit http://www.salutetoveterans.org/showfinder.html for your local listings and air times.

Daryl Williams contributed to this story

Korean Augmentation To the United States Army (KATUSA) REMEMBERED AT THE NATIONAL KOREAN WAR VETERANS MEMORIAL

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

June 10, 2016

Korean Augmentation To the United States Army (KATUSA) REMEMBERED AT THE NATIONAL KOREAN WAR VETERANS MEMORIAL

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The Korean War Veterans Foundation will pay tribute to the more than 8,000 men who served with the U.S. Army during the Korean War at a special commemorative event at the Korean War Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C. on Saturday, June 25, 2016 at 9:00AM.

This ceremony will remember and commemorate the service of over 8,000 Republic of Korea soldiers who gave the ultimate sacrifice serving alongside American United States Army soldiers during the Korean War. Names of the fallen will be read throughout the day and wreaths will be presented at 9:00AM to remember all who served in the Korean War. Members of Congress along with Embassy of the Republic of Korea will be on hand to participate in the reading of the fallen.

Few Americans know, and sadly, some Korean War Era veterans fail to remember the bloodshed by those Korean nationals who were assigned to United States Army units during the Korean War.   The history of the war generally available to our people ignores the KATUSA or, if covered, tends to denigrate their contribution and use in U.S. units.   Lost in that kind of reasoning is why Koreans were assigned to US units! And, that is where this issue becomes one that ought to be acknowledged by America — for there are at least 36 plus thousand American families that should say, “Thank you KATUSAs!”.

Korean Augmentation To the United States Army (KATUSA Korean: 카투사) is a branch of Republic of Korea Army which consists of Korean enlisted personnel who are augmented to the Eighth United States Army (EUSA). KATUSA does not form an individual military unit, instead small numbers of KATUSA members are dispatched throughout the most of the Eighth United States Army departments, filling in positions for the United States Army enlisted soldiers and junior non-commissioned officers. KATUSAs are drafted from pool of qualified volunteers who are subjected to mandatory military service for Korean male citizens. While ROK Army holds the responsibility for personnel management of KATUSAs, KATUSA members are equipped with standard United States Army issues, and live and work with the U.S. enlisted soldiers. This kind of augmentation is unique throughout the entire United States Army worldwide, because KATUSA program was developed during Korean War as a temporary measure to cope with a shortage of personnel in the United States Army. The ceremony will feature

Beginning in July 1950 at the request of General Douglas MacArthur in front of ROK President Syngman Rhee, General Macarthur took command of all ROK Forces. At this time, General Macarthur implemented Korean soldiers into the U.S. Army where there were critical shortages, making the first KATUSA soldiers assigned to 7th Infantry Division, originally in Japan, but mobilized to Incheon in September 1950. This program continued after the Korean War, and KATUSA soldiers would spend 18-months with the U.S. Army learning his occupation and would then return to the ROK Army for training others on the occupation. According to the Eighth Army Wightman NCO Academy, “With the establishment of the ROKA Training Center in 1963…KATUSA soldiers began to spend their whole military tour in the U.S. Army”

About Korean War Veterans Memorial Foundation (www.koreanwarvetsmemorial.org)

The Memorial is unique in that it presents an aura of commitment both by a generation of young American soldiery as well as their comrades from 20 other nations of the United Nations and the Republic of South Korea. Dedicated to the concept that “Freedom Is Not Free”, the Memorial does not glorify war but rather the determination of our people to assist other people in preserving their freedom!

Unique among war memorials, and one of the most visited, the Korean War Veterans Memorial features a column of 19 sculptures representing those members of the Armed Forces of the United States that directly engaged the enemy in ground, sea and air combat and depicts the ethnic and racial makeup of those forces. The sculptures are flanked by a Wall filled with over 2500 photos depicted on the granite surface of personnel and scenes of the war.

The Pool of Remembrance at the head of the Memorial is dedicated to those killed in action, wounded in action, missing in action or held as Prisoner Of War by the enemy. Look closely at the numbers of casualties engraved in the granite border of the Pool and you will understand why the then “Police Action” now must be called a “War”! As surely as World War II was fought to save the world for democracy it can be said that the Korean War was fought to save the world from communism! The stand taken in Korea, and the “line in the sand” drawn there against armed aggression, became the catalyst for the eventual downfall of the goal of communism ,..”.. to enslave the world!”

Visit this Memorial! See for yourself why it is imperative that our goal of raising a Memorial Maintenance Endowment Fund is critical to ensure that it is maintained properly for future generations to enjoy and be inspired.

 

For media inquiries:

Korean War Veterans Memorial Foundation

COL(R) William Weber ~ Chairman of the Board

410-775-7733 ~ email: eagle187@hughes.net

 

 

Retrace the Footsteps of the GIs in Ireland with the GI Trail

Retrace the Footsteps of the GIs in Northern Ireland with the GI Trail and Commemorate D Day with the GI Jive Festival

Bob Kemp with fellow vet Teddy Dixon and the 1940s era models
Northern Ireland has just launched an exciting new project called the GI Trail, which aims to retrace the footsteps of the American GIs who were based in Northern Ireland during the Second World War. This trail is also complimented by the annual GI Jive Festival in Kilkeel, County Down, making Northern Ireland the perfect place to visit for veterans and those with links to this part of the world.

In the 1940s war came to Northern Ireland with the friendly invasion of US troops who were sent to the country in preparation for the Allied invasion of Europe. The rugged, green countryside soon rang to the sounds of American accents and the rumble of Second World War aircraft. The GI Trail aims to expose this fascinating era by mapping out the sites at which the American GIs were located, telling the stories of the men who once called Northern Ireland their home for a short time and exploring the unique legacy they left behind.

  • As many as 300,000 American servicemen passed through Northern Ireland during the war.
  • From January to September 1942, 40,000 Americans arrived in Northern Ireland as part of the 5th US Army Corps HQ, the 34th Infantry (Mechanised) and the 1st US Armored Division. The 34th and 1st Armored Divisions would take part in Operation Torch in November 1942; the invasion of North West Africa, while the 5th Corps departed for England, eventually taking part in the D-Day Landings.
  • From October 1943 to June 1944 a further 120,000 Americans arrived in Northern Ireland including the 15th US Army Corps HQ and the 2nd, 5th and 8th US Infantry Divisions, and the famous 82nd Airborne Divisions and elements of the 8th and 9th Air Forces. They would then depart for Britain to participate in the D-Day Landings.

“It was here in Northern Ireland that the American Army first began to concentrate for our share in the attack upon the citadel of continental Europe. From here started the long, hard march to Allied Victory. Without Northern Ireland I do not see how the American forces could have concentrated to begin the invasion of Europe.”

Dwight D. Eisenhower

The GI Trail has been split into three stages, mapping out the sites with American links in all six counties. The first stage is now complete and is called The Patton Trail, exploring the counties of Down and Armagh. The Hartle Trail will cover Antrim and Derry and the final instalment, The Eisenhower Trail will cover the counties of Fermanagh and Tyrone. These two trails are both in progress with Hartle due for completion in September 2016, and Eisenhower in January 2017. The Patton Trail has gained much support and funding from the Heritage Lottery Fund and local council authorities, and was officially launched by the US Consul General to Belfast, Mr Daniel J Lawton at the end of May.

These exciting trails are self guided, however there are many experts based locally in each area of the province who are available for guided tours for coach trips and groups. The printed trails work in tandem with the interactive website which is all Google Map based allowing users to navigate around the countryside easily – www.gitrailni.com

If you are lucky enough to be in Northern Ireland during the month of July you must make sure you visit the small seaside town of Kilkeel in the foothills of the Mountains of Mourne, County Down for their annual GI Jive Festival. This US themed festival started in 2014 to commemorate the 70th anniversary of D-Day and has been growing ever since. At the end of July the small town comes alive to the sights and sounds of the 1940s. This festival’s main sponsor is American giant B/E Aerospace, a world leader in interior cabin products, fastener distribution, and logistical services for commercial, business & military jets.

In 2015, GI Jive was proud to host World War Two veteran Bob Kemp (now living in Florida, pictured above) who was visiting Northern Ireland at the time. Bob married a Belfast girl whom he met while stationed in Northern Ireland and makes the annual trip ‘home’ every summer to visit his family who still live there. Bob was delighted to meet another fellow veteran at the event, Belfast man Teddy Dixon who served with the US Rainbow Division during the war. Both men had a great afternoon in Kilkeel, soaking up the festival atmosphere and reminiscing about their time in Northern Ireland. So if you are in Northern Ireland/ Ireland on the 30th July 2016, come along and be our guest of honour for the day!

GI Jive 2016

On Saturday 30th July 2016, Kilkeel will be all swinging and all jiving so do not miss out on this thrilling event at which you can witness historical re-enactments, watch a fly past by a local flying club, walk around an authentic recreation of an American WWII camp and view their vehicles, tanks and weapons. Learn how to jive to authentic swing music and immerse yourself in 1940s glamour with vintage fashion shows and best dressed competitions; so make sure you dress to impress!

GI Jive is teaming up with Tourism NI’s Year of Food and Drink 2016 programme to showcase the amazing food and drink Northern Ireland has to offer. Kilkeel is famous for its fresh seafood and GI Jive will be hosting a seafood pavilion housing numerous stalls cooking and selling delicious seafood, ranging from locally caught prawns and scallops to haddock and monkfish. If you are a novice to seafood you can learn how to prepare and cook it at one of the many live cookery demonstrations carried out by our celebrity chefs. If seafood is not your thing there will be many other delicious offerings to get your taste buds tingling, such as our artisan food marquees which will be stocking locally sourced produce from jams and chutneys, to tasty street food and homemade ice-cream and chocolate accompanied by local drinks providers who brew beer at the foot of the Mourne Mountains.

Northern Ireland has much to offer travelling vets and their families in 2016 so make sure to keep this beautiful country in mind when booking your vacation! We would also love to hear from any vets families who had family members stationed in Northern Ireland during the run up to D Day, so please get in touch through our websites, we would love to hear from you! For more information on the GI Trail and GI Jive please see below.

GI Trail
Website: www.gitrailni.com | Email: gitrail.ni@gmail.com

GI Jive Festival
Website: www.gijivefestival.com | Email: info@gijivefestival.com | Phone: 028 417 62525

If you are interested in booking a trip to Northern Ireland, these links below might be useful:
Tourism NI
www.tourismni.com
Discover Northern Ireland
www.discovernorthernireland.com
Discover NI Accommodation Provider
https://www.discovernorthernireland.com/accomfinder/

Transition Services Now Mandatory for Outprocessing Soldiers

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All soldiers who are leaving active duty, whether they are regular Army members who are separating or retiring or reservists demobilizing after six months or more on active duty, now must participate in services to help them transition to civilian life, Army Times reported.

Army Secretary John McHugh mandated the change in a directive issued last year.

Walter M. Herd, director of the Army Career and Alumni Program, told the Army Times he expects about a 300 percent increase in the number of soldiers using his program, which provides career counseling, education, job-preparation and job-search services. Read More